Above left: The Gimbal UAP was part of a whole fleet that flew against the wind, stopped in mid-air, then rotated. Filmed by Navy pilots in 2015, it was released by To The Stars Academy. Click here for the video.

Above right: A triangle or pyramid-shaped object, one of several — as well as some brightly lit spheres — hovered around Navy ships in 2019, some of which then slowly descended into the ocean without a trace found by submarines or sonar. It was filmed by the Navy and released by Jeremy Corbell.
Click here for the triangle video.   Click here for the sphere video.

UFOs are real.   

That’s one of my favorite sentences ever written, along with: I’m in remission; I’m a grandfather; Biden won and Cappuccino Blasts are on sale.

It seems as though ever since the New York Times’s bombshell reporting in December 2017 that the Pentagon is studying UFOs (and has been for decades), the floodgates have been released. Now — due to a clause in a Covid relief bill, believe it or not — the Pentagon has to give an unclassified report on UFOs to Congress this month.

UFOs are called UAPs now — Unidentified Aerial Phenomenon. It’s likely that re-naming the phenomenon alleviates decades of the giggle factor and rebrands them away from the days of swamp gas, little green men, and tin foil hats.   

The Pentagon’s serious inquiry into the UAP phenomenon seems like one of the most amazing stories ever told, one of the most profound stories of humanity.

When even snack foods are watching for the UAP report, you know it’s hit the national stage in a big way.

And I’m not the only one who can’t stop thinking about all this. Along with the New York Times, the Washington Post, CNN, MSNBC, NPR, Politico, and many other organizations (including Fox News) are running story after story about the phenomenon. Even snack food makers are excited about the upcoming report!

There are lots of skeptics and amateur debunkers out there. They say all the sightings can be explained away by weird weather, malfunctioning equipment, or mistaken identities. But think about it for just a second: Top Gun pilots, career military officers and seasoned intelligence officials aren’t mistaking these things for seagulls, balloons or Venus. Besides, we’ve got pictures…

And videos. When the government admits that a bunch of UAP sightings are real and can’t be explained, well, it’s paradigm shattering. It’s almost impossible to imagine objects that don’t adhere to basic physics. A craft — part of a whole fleet — goes against the wind, stops in midair and rotates. An enormous Tic Tac-shaped object bounces back-and-forth over the ocean with no visible signs of propulsion or lift, then shoots away at speeds that are literally impossible with our understanding of physics. Cubes inside of spheres whiz past our fighter jets on the East Coast. Pyramids/triangles hover above our Navy on the West Coast with seeming impunity as weirdly lit spheres fly alongside our ships, then gradually descend into the ocean without a trace.

Heck, James Woolsey — who ran the CIA under Clinton — said, A friend of mine was able to have his aircraft stop at 40,000 feet or so and not continue operating as a normal aircraft. 

Say what now?

NASA Administrator Bill Nelson told Politico, I was briefed on what those Navy pilots saw … there’s some phenomenon that we need to explain.

I don’t know about you, but it’s almost impossible to comprehend these events. And I’ve been interested in this stuff for years. There is more, so much more. More than a hundred cases, at the very least, since just the dawn of the new millennium. And no, these phenomena didn’t originate from us or the other super powers. I can’t wait to read, hear, or see what more the Pentagon report tells us, if we’re allowed to see any of it.

Yes, I have been obsessed with this story and it’s not because I have experienced things I can’t explain (I have). I think part of my fascination is derived from reality not being as it appears. Or like my favorite musician Sting sings, “there’s more to this journey than is apparent to the eye. 

Speaking of musicians, we have Tom DeLonge to thank for bringing a lot of this into the public eye. DeLonge was the lead singer of the post-punk band Blink-182 before founding To The Stars Academy, whose purpose is to collect data, develop technology and explain to all of us just what the heck is going on. His team got the 2017 story into the New York Times, and also released three of the now-famous videos.

Former Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid initiated the funding for the Pentagon’s Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program (AATIP) in 2007. He did so with the help of two other senators — including Ted Stevens of Alaska, who had an unidentified craft follow his plane during World War II. Back then, pilots called those crafts foo fighters not to be confused with food fighters or the rock band Foo Fighters.

Reid said he was told for decades that Lockheed Martin had some retrieved crashed UAP materials. Crashed UFO stuff. Say that out loud or repeat it to yourself. Doesn’t that boggle your brain?!

Luis Elizondo used to run AATIP at the Pentagon. He came up with a classification system that speaks to how we identify the unidentifiables. Lue, as he’s known, says there are five observables:

 

Lue Elizondo’s Five Observables

1) Anti-gravity lift. These objects have been sighted overcoming the earth’s gravity with no visible means of propulsion. They also lack any flight surfaces, such as wings.

2) Sudden and instantaneous acceleration. They’re just hovering, then suddenly take off like a shot. It would turn any pilot into mush if they were inside.

3) Hypersonic velocities without signatures. If an aircraft travels faster than the speed of sound, it leaves “signatures” like vapor trails and sonic booms. Many UAP accounts note the lack of such evidence.

4) Low observability, or cloaking. The ability to hide from our technology or our eyes. (So they’re UN-observable)

5) Trans-medium travel. Easily traversing space, air, land and water.

 

A concerned parent asked former defense intelligence officer Lue Elizondo about explaining UAPs to his daughter.

I know all this sounds bananas. It is, a whole buncha bananas. 

People I talk to (harangue?) about this are sometimes excited, sometimes scared and sometimes annoyed. I know folks worry about being taken over, occupied, farmed, abducted, enslaved, Twilight Zoned, etc. And, of course, there are credible stories of UAPs turning on and turning off nuclear missile silos in the U.S. and the former Soviet Union. But I’m not the only one who thinks if The Others/The Phenomenon/I didn’t say Aliens — wanted to do something bad, it probably would’ve happened 70 years ago, or thousands. Who’s to say there’s just one set or one civilization, or where they’re even from? Elizondo told the Washington Post this week “There are all sorts of options of what this could be… It could be from outer space, inner space or the space in between.” They could’ve been here all along. Or maybe they began showing up a lot more when we savage sapiens started slinging atomic bombs and nuclear energy.

So we sit here in wonder, waiting for the Pentagon to share what they know. It’s not a given that we’ll hear a ton more. I’m told they like to keep national security secrets, um, secret. Sure, there may be prosaic explanations for everything, too. That’s always possible. But if not, what could we conceivably hope for out of all this?

World-changing energy technology, for starters. “The fact that these craft do not seem to produce exhaust, yet fly vast distances at immense speeds could provide technical solutions to our energy crisis,” says Christopher Mellon, the former deputy assistant secretary of defense for intelligence. Mellon is a prominent voice in all of this and worked with Elizondo back during their government days. Now, along with appearing on innumerable news shows and podcasts, they both brief Congress on what’s happening and what’s coming. 

Mellon appeared in hands-down the best film about the phenomenon, appropriately titled The Phenomenon. James Fox’s stellar film features senators, governors, astronauts, pilots, intel officials, a White House chief of staff, and great investigative journalists like Leslie Kean and George Knapp. It explains in depth what’s been going on for the past 75 years, and is even narrated by Ken Burns documentary narrator Peter Coyote.

Many, many foreign governments are studying the same things and are likely trying to figure it out before we do. This whole movement, bringing this all to light, has been dubbed Disclosure. But it kind of feels like Disclosure has already happened and we’re now in the Confirmation stage. At least that’s what some of my new friends over on #ufotwitter have to say, (shout out to Chris Wolford, @devgru1980mi on the Twitter machine.)

I hope you’ll keep an open mind about what’s occurring. Like I said, this is all so incredibly weird. I still feel odd writing about it. There is so much more out there that we don’t understand, and I understand if you need more evidence. 

That will hopefully happen very soon.

___

Some other fun bits:

“What is true, and I’m actually being serious here, is that there is footage and records of objects in the skies that we don’t know exactly what they are.” Former President Barack Obama on The Late Late Show with James Corden

 

“I don’t laugh at people any more when they say they’ve seen UFOs, because I’ve seen one myself.” Former President Jimmy Carter filed two reports about seeing a UFO when he was Georgia’s governor.

 

“Frankly, there are a lot more sightings than have been made public.” John Ratcliffe, the former Director of National Intelligence

 

The Defense department has studied subjects like warp drives, extra-dimensional manipulation, dark energy and highly exotic forms of space travel.  — as reported by The Drive

 

Rodney Curtis is a recovering journalist and author of four books.

Check out Rodney’s books here.